ext3

If you decide to upgrade your ext2 partition to ext3, and you are using quik, you may run into some problems.

The quik bootloader normally loads the kernel and second stage bootloader directly from your /boot directory on your ext2 partition (assuming it’s not a seperate partition). For a boot to be successful, quik must be able to read this location, ie. it must
be in ext2 format.

ext3 is backwards compatible with ext2, assuming that it was cleanly unmounted. Crashes, power failures, or simply turning off the computer without properly unmounting may cause problems with quik accessing the ext2 partition.

Three Different Solutions

  1. A solution may be to create a separate ext2 partition to keep the kernel on, so that if your ext3 partition was cleanly unmounted, you will still be able to boot. Make this partition maybe 5-10 MB, so you have some room to work from.
  2. Or maybe just keep your root partition as ext2, and make your other stuff ext3 (as these are larger and takes a long time to fsck).
  3. Or ignore this problem all together, and just keep a floppy handy incase your system doesn’t unmount cleanly, and you need to boot off it. This is a poor idea, if you don’t like messing with fsck, the command line, or your computer isn’t reliable at floppy
    booting.

Partitioning Examples

This is an example of what a potential user’s set up might look like. Many of you may decide to set up your partition layout slightly different to fit your needs.

Sizes based on Debian User Guide suggestions and a typical old 2 GB hard drive devoted to PPC Linux. In theory this all adds up to 20 GB, but my math skills aren’t perfect. Be aware at 2 GB HD is probably only really 1,990 MB or so big, depending on the size of the driver and actual size of drive.

Name Type Size Description
/ ext2 1850 MB Your root partition. Everything goes here (your system is small enough). See the below one for a better breakup, that would make backups, among other things easier, if that’s what you prefer.
/boot ext2 10 MB Keep this ext2 for the safety reasons explained above. Your kernel (no symlinks), symbols.map and quik parts go here.
SWAP ext2 128 MB Twice your ram, generally is the rule. RAM usually isn’t expensive, so make sure you have plenty.

Sizes based on Debian User Guide suggestions and a 20 GB hard drive devoted to PPC Linux. These are so cheap, you probably should drop one in your old Mac. In theory this all adds up to 20 GB, but my math skills aren’t perfect. Be aware at 20 GB HD is probably only really 19,950
MB or so big, depending on the size of the driver and actual size of drive.

Name Type Size Description
/ ext2 100 MB Keep this ext2 for the safety reasons explained above. Contains your base libaries and bootloader: /boot, /etc, /bin, /sbin,
/lib and /dev
SWAP ext2 500 MB Twice your ram, generally is the rule. RAM usually isn’t expensive, so make sure you have plenty.
/usr ext3 10,000 MB All “User” Programs, Libraries and Documentation goes here, that is installed as part of the system (through apt, rpm, etc.).
This needs to be big, as programs like OpenOffice, KDE/GNOME, Mozilla are really big.
/usr/local ext3 2,350 MB Everything you compile, and install for all users, will end up here. So make it reasonable (if you never compile stuff, then make it small or just skip it — make it part of /usr.
/home ext3 5,000 MB People’s Home Directories—Debian recommends a minimum of 100 MB per user, but if your building stuff, you’ll want lots of space.
/usr/local ext3 2,000 MB Everything you compile, and install for all users, will end up here. So make it reasonable (if you never compile stuff, then make it small or just skip it — make it part of /usr.
/var ext3 1,000 MB This really doesn’t have to be this big, but if your a Debian user who really digs apt, never cleans up, and have the space, this
is a decent size.
/tmp ext3 50 MB Temp files go here. Good idea to have seperate if you have the space, and don’t mind, as sometimes when freaky things happen, they spill lots of data here (this is better to jam up then your whole
HD).
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